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How to avoid employee feedback dropping into a black hole

by | Apr 17, 2018

Asking for employee input is always a good idea. Whether it’s a formal engagement survey, a questions-and-comments feature on the intranet or employee focus groups on particular issues, employees appreciate  having a voice. Besides, they bring an awareness of ongoing issues and useful insights that might otherwise be invisible to leadership.

But management needs to make sure they close the loop. Once employees have offered their thoughts and opinions, they tend to expect something to happen as a result. Don’t let their valuable feedback fall into a black hole.

Employees realize the company can’t say yes to everything. Clearly, every employee preference can’t be accommodated nor can every employee suggestion be implemented. By making one choice, the company opts out of others.

Still, employees need to know that they’ve been heard. If your intranet accepts employee suggestions for ideas and innovations, make sure you’ve got a process in place for someone to read those suggestions and to thank the employee, whether or not that idea is one the company could adopt.

They also want to know the business reasons behind decisions. When employee input has been solicited for a key decision at the company, from healthcare benefits to flex workdays to the platform for a new intranet, some employees will be taken aback when their recommendation is not the one adopted.

Tell them why the decision that was made is the best one for the business. Show how that decision best supports the company vision. Share how employee input helped shape the decision, but wasn’t the only consideration.

It also helps to discuss those options discussed but discarded. For lack of a better example, let’s say management decided to make chocolate ice cream the official dessert in the company cafeteria. Those who suggested vanilla and strawberry and butter pecan might feel their opinions were ignored. Just by acknowledging some of the other possibilities considered, you’re letting employees know that their input was given consideration.

Finally, make clear the difference between a voice and a vote. By giving employees a voice in upcoming decisions, management is not handing over responsibility for decision making. At some point, leadership has to make the call and move on.

Is your company engaging in an ongoing conversation with employees? Tribe can help.

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